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Reflection Questions

1 Dec

There are three questions that you must address:

Why did you choose the pieces that you chose?

How did these pieces evolve? Give specific examples. Explain why you felt these changes were necessary.

What are your writing strengths and weaknesses now?

Here are some other questions that you might consider when writing your portfolio. You should pick a minimum of 2, but the more you consider, the stronger your reflection will be:

Who do you think you are as a writer at this moment in time? Has that changed since you began college? How so?

Who do you want to be as a writer in the future?

How do you want to use writing in the future?

Has your definition of what makes a person a writer changed at all?

Have your thoughts about why we write evolved?

How do you define “good” writing?

Did any specific assignment, workshop, or feedback help you to improve more so than others?

How do you feel about the feedback that you gave your classmates throughout the semester? Did you learn anything from giving feedback?

You may, of course, choose to talk about things that are not on either of these lists.

Also, don’t feel that you need to address these things in any particular order. Write them in whatever structure is most effective and flows best.

The Final Portfolio

17 Nov

What Makes Up a Final Portfolio?

Title: Your final portfolio must have a creative title. My/The Final Portfolio is not an acceptable title. Think about what you want readers to focus on in your work or something that describes the work that you are presenting in your portfolio to help you come up with one.

Table of Contents: This may be done differently depending on the form your final portfolio takes, but there must be some way for readers to figure out what piece went where.

Reflection: This is one of the most important pieces of your portfolio. It is the place where you tell readers about your work and about who you are as a writer. It also gives me insight into the ways that you have revised your pieces, since I cannot tell by simply looking at a piece. In fact, often times, an outstanding analytical reflection paper can help bolster weaker writing. You should use this as a place to talk about why you included specific pieces, how these pieces and your writing in general evolved (if you think it did), and your writing strengths and weaknesses at this stage in the game. Closer to the end of the semester, I will give you a list of questions to help prompt your thinking.

However, the reflection letter is not a course evaluation. Don’t mistake talking about your growth as a writer with talking about the awesomeness/awfulness of this class. Saying “Nicole was a terrible teacher” won’t really help an audience understand who you feel you are as a writer or what you think your portfolio offers readers.

And since students always ask, I will tell you in advance that there is no page minimum technically, but I’d find it hard to believe that anyone could do a sufficient job in less than 3 pages. I am willing to read as much as you’d like to write.

You can place the reflection anywhere in your portfolio that you so choose– beginning, end, middle—as long as you’ve given thought to why that place is the right place for it. You might also choose to write a large whole-portfolio reflection and a smaller reflection on each piece of writing.

Contents: The contents of the portfolio should be pieces of writing that reflect your best work and/or the work that means the most to you. It is a display of who you have become as a writer. There are some basic guidelines to follow, however. You must include:

  • 2 revised major assignments (Literacy Narrative, Somewhere I Belong project, Writing as Activism project)
  • 1 revised freewrite
  • 2 revised mini-assignment (modest proposals, PSA, album and reflection, rhetorical analysis, the most boring essays ever, writing center reactions, freewrite blog post, )
  • 2 other revised pieces of your choice
  • optional: anything else that you have written in this course that you want to include

Everything in your portfolio must be significantly revised from the last draft that you turned in, and it should be polished for an audience.

 

What Does a Final Portfolio Look Like?

There are several ways that you may approach the final portfolio.

You can create a website. For this, I recommend GoogleSites because it’s free and easy to use. LiveBinder is another interesting option, but it does not allow you to paste in Word Documents, only PDFs and websites. This, to me, seems like the most logical option for many of you.

You can use Glogster to create a poster that links to your work.

You can give me a typical Word Document. If you’re including several digital projects (blogs, documentaries, etc.), this may not be the best option. You can, of course, include links, but your ability to personalize a document is limited.

You can choose some other option not listed here, as long as you run it by me and get approval first.

 

Turning It In

The portfolio will be due at noon on Wednesday, December 14. There will be a discussion board set up on Blackboard where you can submit your work. It is time-stamped, so I will know exactly when you turned it in.

The final portfolio will be worth 30% of your grade.

If I do not receive your final portfolio, you will not pass this class. Let me repeat that: if you do not hand in your portfolio on time, you will fail.